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 Übersetzung für 'present participle' von Englisch nach Deutsch
ling.
present participle
Partizipium {n} der Gegenwart
ling.
present participle
Mittelwort {n} der Gegenwart [Partizip I]
ling.
present participle <ppr, ppr., p.pr.; pres-p> [abbrev. "pres-p" used in dict.cc]
Partizip {n} Präsens [Partizip I] <Part. Präs.; pres-p> [Abk. „pres-p“ in dict.cc verwendet]
Teiltreffer
ling.
participle
Partizip {n}
83
ling.
participle
Mittelwort {n}
46
ling.
past participle
Perfektpartizip {n}
ling.
passive participle
Partizip {n} Passiv
ungeprüft
ling.
dangling participle
Partizip {n} mit falschem Bezug
ling.
past participle
Partizip {n} Perfekt <Partizip II>
ling.
active participle
Partizip {n} Aktiv
ling.
past participle
Mittelwort {n} der Vergangenheit
ling.
adverbial participle
Adverbialpartizip {n}
ling.
misrelated participle
Partizip {n} mit falschem Bezug
ling.
perfect participle
Partizipium {n} der Vergangenheit
ling.
past participle
zweites Partizip {n}
ling.spec.
pseudo-participle [ancient Egyptian]
Pseudopartizip {n}
ling.
past participle <past-p, pp> [abbrev. used in dict.cc]
Partizip II {n} <past-p, pp> [Abk. wie sie im dict.cc verwendet werden]
chem.
present {adj}
vorkommend
31
to presentausstellen
66
ling.
present
Präsens {n}
99
to presentaufweisen
106
to presentpräsentieren
995
to presentvorführen
126
23 Übersetzungen
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Anwendungsbeispiele Englisch
  • The first sentence is in the past tense ("were"), but a present participle expresses the progressive aspect ("be standing").
  • Both forms are used with the verbal noun (equivalent to the English present participle) to create compound tenses.
  • In traditional grammars, gerunds are distinguished from other uses of a verb's "-ing" form: the present participle (which is a non-finite verb form like the gerund, but is adjectival or adverbial in function), and the pure verbal noun or deverbal noun.
  • 'provide food for', literally 'restore to a former state' and, being the present participle of the verb, The term "restaurant" may have been used in 1507 as a "restorative beverage", and in correspondence in 1521 to mean 'that which restores the strength, a fortifying food or remedy'.
  • There are four non-finite verb forms: infinitive, passive infinitive, and the two participles: perfective/past participle and imperfective/present participle.

  • Stress is on the first syllable (first vowel), except that the opposite suffix "-o" is always stressed, and the verbal prefixes "u-" (present participle) and "y-" (past tense) are never stressed.
  • In some areas perfect aspect of a verb is indicated using "be" as auxiliary with the preposition "after" and the present participle: for example "He is after going" instead of "He has gone" (this construction is borrowed from Scottish Gaelic).
  • , "ion", "going", the present participle of [...] , "ienai", "to go".
  • The language is characterized by a certain "Latinizing" influence in its syntax, especially the tendency to place the verb at the end of the sentence; as well as other such details, such as the use of the present participle, which bring "Amadís" into line with the allegorical style of the 15th century.
  • English has an active participle, also called a present participle; and a passive participle, also called a past participle.

  • "Verðandi" is literally the present participle of the Old Norse verb "verða", "to become", and is commonly translated as "in the making" or "that which is happening/becoming"; it is related to the Dutch word "worden" and the German word "werden", both meaning "to become".
  • Eastern Armenian has three present participles, while Western Armenian has one.
  • means "that which is in the process of happening" (it is the present participle of the verb cognate to [...]), and [...] means 'debt' or 'guilt' (from a Germanic root [...] 'to owe', also found in English "should" and "shall").
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© dict.cc English-German dictionary 2024
Enthält Übersetzungen von der TU Chemnitz sowie aus Mr Honey's Business Dictionary (nur Englisch/Deutsch).
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